Tour Guide of Tunisia

Oman Tour Guide - Visas

The Omani immigration authorities reserve the right to reject any applicant on arrival, even if the passenger meets all requirements as per the guideline. Just a few years ago, Oman admitted no one -- even other Gulf Arabs -- without visas. That has...

Oman Tour Guide - Permits

Site permits In order to visit archaeological sites, old forts etc., it is necessary to obtain a permit from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage in Muscat. They are easy to obtain from the Ministry which is in the same building as the...

When to visit Oman?

Oman is a country with dramatic mountain scenery and long pristine beaches, and it is well worth a visit. The best time to visit Oman is between mid-October and mid-March. In the south the monsoon is from June to September, and so a visit in October...

Oman - Souqs

In the Sultanate of Oman, every town or village has its souq. These traditional souq's, or markets, have for many centuries provided the shopper with a veritable treasure trove of fascinating items, and business flourishes in an atmosphere which is...

Oman - Customs regulations

Non-Muslims can import one bottle of spirits. There are no restrictions involving cameras, computers or cassette players.

Oman - Departure tax

There is a tax of OR3 for all departing international passengers at Seeb Airport in Muscat.

Oman - Communications

Telecommunications No further progress was made for more than ten decades after the first pot office was established in Oman in 1856. Indian postage stamps were used until 1947; British postage stamps had also been used after Indian independence and...

Public holidays of Oman

The Muslim holidays of Eid Al-Fitr (at the end of Ramadan), Eid Al-Adha (during the Hajj), Islamic New Year and the Prophet's Birthday are all observed. Non-religious holidays observed in Oman are New Year's Day (January 1), National Day (November...

Bahrain Tourism

The 1980s saw a boom in tourism, caused partially by the opening of the 25km causeway linking the island to the East Coast of Saudi Arabia. The government responded to the influx which today is in excess of 2 million people annually by launching a...

Bahrain - Visa requirements

British citizens and Gulf Cooperation Council nationals (GCC -- Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and the Sultanate of Oman) do not need visas to enter Bahrain. Britons may stay up to one month while GCC nationals are free to...

Bahrain - Historic sights

Tours to historic sights operate daily. These include the renovated home of a pearl merchant, the old Portuguese forts and the excavations at Saar where visitors can actually walk around the 4000-year-old town. Many artifacts have been found there...

Hotels and apartments of Bahrain

The choice of hotel rooms for tourists and business travellers includes all the major franchise chains. With families accounting for over 90% of tourists, there is also a growing demand for self-catering accommodation. Numerous apartments are being...

Shopping in Bahrain

Shopping facilities include Arabian antiques (pictured), oriental carpet dealers, modern department stores, supermarkets catering to foreigners, jewelers and of course the souk- the traditional Arab market place where almost everything can be found.

Sporting activities in Bahrain

Available sporting activities include horseback riding, sailing, all kinds of water sports and there is a variety of sports clubs. Fully equipped private gymnasiums offer a range of activities as well as weight rooms and squash courts.

Communications of Bahrain

Bahrain's telecommunications services are among the most advanced in the world with direct dialling to most countries. Postal services are speedy and reliable. Both Bahrain International Airport and the Port of Mina Sulman meet the highest...

Bahrain Media

Bahrain has the following national newspapers; Al-Ayam , a leading daily Arabic newspaper, ::I the leading daily English newspaper, and The Gulf Daily News an excellent source of information for events in hotels, restaurants, shops etc. There is a...

Customs regulations of Bahrain

200 cigarettes, half a pound of tobacco and one bottle of spirits are allowed duty free. Prohibited are pornographic and obscene literature and pictures, arms and ammunition, cultured and undrilled pearls.

Bahrain - Departure tax

A tax of BD3 is payable at the airport upon departure.

The treasures of Bahrain

Despite its small landmass and population, Bahrain has a rich cultural heritage dating to about 5,000 years back. The splendour of its ancient civilization is revealed in a wealth of historical treasures housed in its museums. The Muharraq Museum...

Passports and visas of Egypt

Visitors must hold passports valid for at least six months. Tourist visas can be obtained from Egyptian consulates throughout the world. Visa costs vary according to nationality with visas to U.S. and GCC citizens the least expensive. Some...

Egypt - The riddle of the Sphinx

The Sphinx (pictured) is the first large, royal statue known in ancient Egypt and is one of the world's most significant monuments. A colossal 240 feet long and 66 feet high, it lies in the old kingdom quarry, carved from a core of solid bedrock and...

Tourist Offices of Egypt

Austria Aegyptisches Fremdenverkehrsamt Elisabeth Str. 4, Pornringhof 1010 Vienna Tel: (1) 587-6633 Canada Egyptian Tourist Authority Place Bonaventure 40 Frontenac Montreal, Quebec H5A 1V4 Tel: (514) 867-4420 or P.O. Box 304 Montreal, Quebec H5A...

Cairo, the city of 1,000 minarets

The first mosque ever to be built in Egypt was simple in design. It was built by Ibn El-A'as in 642 AD on a site north of Fort Babylon, and its original pillars were the trunks of palm trees with a roof covered with palm leaves. Over the years,...

Egyptian museums

Abbasiyya Al Ahram Al Arish Alexandria Aswan Asyut Ataba Bulaq Dokki Downtown Cairo Gezira Giza Harraniyya Heliopolis Islamic Cairo Ismailia Luxor Old Cairo Port Said Ramses Roda Island The Citadel Zamalek

Visas of Algeria

Single entry or business visas to Algeria for one month take 2-3 days to obtain from Algerian Embassies throughout the world. Three passport photos are required and a specified fee; the visa might be renewed in Algeria. A 3-month multiple entry visa...

Customs in Algeria

Visitors can bring up to 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars or 400 grams of tobacco with them as well as one bottle of spirits and two bottles of wine. All valuable personal items including electrical goods, jewellery, cameras, video cameras, etc. should be...

Money in Algeria

The Algerian Dinar, divided into 100 centimes, is the official currency of Algeria. This currency comes in paper denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 dinars. Coins come in 5,10,20 and 50 centimes as well as 1, 5 and 10 dinars. The Algerian...

Currency Regulations of Algeria

All foreign currency in the form of cash and traveller's cheques carried into Algeria must be declared on arrival in the country. A Currency Declaration Form must be completed and submitted to customs authorities at the port of entry. Customs...

Public Holidays in Algeria

New Years Day: 1 January Labour Day: 1 May Commemoration Day: 19 June Independence Day: 5 July Anniversary of the Revolution: 1 November Would you please note that Eid Al-Fitr, Eid Al-Adha, the new Islamic Year and Prophet Muhammed birthday are all...

Telephone System in Algeria

Like the postal system, the telephone system in Algeria is substandard. Overseas calls can take hours to put through, particularly those made outside the capital city of Algiers. There are public telephone exchanges usually in or beside the Post...

Postal System in Algeria

The postal system is slow and inefficient. Post sent from provincial towns is very slow. Parcels are slower still and must be opened for inspection prior to mailing. It is advisable to send letters and parcels from major cities rather than smaller...

Algerian Museums

Algiers National Museum of Antiquities Parc de la Liberté. Hours: 9am-12 noon & 2pm-5pm daily except Friday morning and Saturday. Admission: Free. Antique mosaics, Roman glass work and sculptures and Islamic art are on display. Museum of...

Cities in Algeria: Algiers

The capital city of Algeria and the most important Mediterranean port of northwest Africa, Algiers has a population of over 3 million, making it the largest population centre in the country. Algiers is located on the Mediterranean coast, set against...

Cities in Algeria: Annaba

The eastern port city of Annaba is the third largest city in Algeria and an important industrial and shipping centre. Annaba was first settled by Phoenicians as Hippo Regius and allied with Carthage. Hippo Regius was a haven for the Numidian kings...

Cities in Algeria: Bijaya

A centre of Algeria's recently-developed petrochemical industry, Bijaya is an important regional town located on the sea at the base of Gouraya mountain. The site of Bijaya was first settled as a trading post by Phoenicians and was later controlled...

Cities in Algeria: Constantine

Constantine is one of Algeria's principal cities and an industrial centre for the production of leather goods and linen and wool textiles. It is spectacularly set upon a stone mountain overlooking the Rhumel Gorges 200m below which are spanned by...

Cities in Algeria: Oran

With a population of approximately 800,000 Oran is Algeria's second largest city and one of the country's busiest ports as well as being a major trading and industrial centre. Products manufactured in Oran include plastics, chemicals, wine and...

Cities in Algeria: Sétif

Sétif has existed since Roman times and is located at an elevation of 1,100m. After the French occupied the town in 1838, it was rebuilt and transformed into a military garrison. One of the earliest explosions of modern nationalist violence occurred...

Cities in Algeria: Tlemcen

Located 170 miles from Oran, Tlemcen is one of Algeria's great Islamic cities which flourished as an Arab sultanate from 1282 until 1553 when it became part of the Ottoman Empire. The city is still set amidst olive groves and vineyards in one of...

Iraq Visas

No visitor's visas are currently being issued, effectively closing Iraq to all foreigners.

The North-East Mountains in Iraq

The high mountains and fertile valleys of this area of Northern Iraq are in sharp contrast to the terrain of the rest of the country. This area is mostly inhabited by Kurds and is known as the Kurdish Autonomous Region (KAR). This friendly and...

Cities in Iraq: The Marshes

The marshes cover a large area between the Tigris and the Euphrates, stretching from Kut in the north to Basra in the south. This vast expanse of marshland dotted with shallow lagoons occupies a total area of about 10,00 sq. km. and is the home of...

Cities in Iraq: Baghdad

Founded in AD762 by Abu Jafar al-Mansur, the second Abbasid caliph, the city of Baghdad was originally built on the west bank of the Tigris River. Circular walls enclosed the city and, although its original name was Madinat as-Salam (City of Peace...

Baghdad sights

The city of Baghdad once had many interesting museums and mosques, which, if Iraq is ever re-opened to the outside world, could prove fascinating to the visitor. Allied bombing of Baghdad during the Gulf War, of course, leaves considerable doubt as...

Cities in Iraq: Basra

Iraq's second largest city and main seaport, Basra is situated 130km from the Gulf and 550km south-east of Baghdad. Originally intended as a military base, the city was founded in AD637 by Caliph Omar. During the 16th century it became an important...

Cities in Iraq: Mosul

Mosul is Iraq's third largest city and is situated 396km north of Baghdad. The city was an important trade centre in the Abbasid era, because of its strategic position on the caravan route between India, Persia and the Mediterranean. Mosul's chief...

Iraq Tour Guide: Ur of the Chaldees

Situated near the town of Nasiriya, about 370km south-east of Baghdad, this is one of Iraq's most imposing ancient sites. In former days it stood on the banks of the Euphrates, until the river changed its course. The earliest buildings date from...

Nineveh

The ancient city of Nineveh is situated just outside Mosul on the east bank of the River Tigris. It was the third capital of Assyria dating from the reign of Sennacherib (704-681BC)and was one of the most powerful cities of the Middle East, the hub...

Cities in Iraq: Nimrud

Once Assyria's second capital, the ancient site of the city of Nimrud lies about 37km southeast of Mosul, on the eastern bank of the River Tigris, south of Nineveh. It was first designated as the Assyrian capital by Ashurnasirpal II in 879BC and...

Cities in Iraq: Babylon

Situated 90km south of Baghdad, Babylon was once the capital city of the kingdom of Babylonia. It is perhaps the most famous of all the ancient sites in Iraq. First reaching prominence under King Hammurabi, and achieving its zenith during the reign...

Iraq Tour Guide: Kerbala & Najaf

These two sites are of great religious significance to Muslims. Kerbala, lying 108km southwest of Baghdad, is the site of the battle of Kerbala, which was fought in AD680 between the two main Islamic sects -- Sunni and Shiite. The leader of the...

Cities in Iraq: Arch of Ctesiphon

Situated 30km south of Baghdad, east of the Tigris, the now ruined city of Ctesiphon was first built in the second century BC by the Parthian Persians. Today there is very little left of its former glories, except a colossal arch which is thought...

Jordan Visas

Required by all visitors. Tourist visa valid for 1 month.

Holidays in Jordan

Friday is the official weekly day of rest, although many Christian shopkeepers choose to close on Sunday instead. Both Christian and Islamic holidays are observed, as well as various historical remembrance days. They are as follows: Labour Day: May...

Telephone System in Jordan

Service has improved recently with the increased use of digital switching equipment, but better access to the telephone system is needed in the rural areas and easier access to pay-telephones is needed by the urban public. Domestic: microwave radio...

Travel Agents in Jordan

There follows a list of some of the leading travel agents in Jordan. Nebo Tourism Services Company Tel: +962 618864 Fax: +962 647117 International Traders Tel: +962 607014 Fax: +962 669905 Middle East Company Tel: +962 683494 Fax: +962 681903 Al...

Jordan Cities: Amman

Known as Rabbath Ammon in biblical times and as Philadelphia when it was part of the Roman Empire, Amman is now a thriving, modern city. It was originally built on a group of seven hills, but is now spread over a wider area of hilly terrain....

Jordan: Shopping in Amman

Amman has shopping facilities ranging from I to boutiques. You may find such diversity as haute couture from Paris, leather goods from Turkey, casual clothes from Italy and traditional dress from the Bedouin tribes' people. Craft shops specialize in...

Jordan Cities: Aqaba

Aqaba is 204 miles (328km) from Amman, is Jordan's only seaport. It is situated at the northern tip of the Red Sea, which is also the southern tip of the Kingdom. The port city boasts 360 days of sunshine per year and is therefore a popular summer...

Jordan Tour Guide: The Dead Sea

Just 34 miles (55km) from Amman and at 1,306ft below sea level, the Dead Sea lies at the lowest point on Earth. As its name suggests, the sea is devoid of all life, due to an extremely high content of salts and minerals. But it is these natural...

Jordan Cities: The Decapolis

There are four Roman cities in Jordan, in addition to Jerash, which formed part of the Decapolis: Pella in the north Jordan Valley is one of the largest and most important archaeological sites in the region. Situated on the banks of the Wadi Jirm,...

Jordan's Desert Castles

Scattered throughout the desert east of Amman are a number of castles, which constitute the most important examples of early Islamic art and architecture to be found anywhere in the Middle East. The castles were built in the 7::SUP

Jordan Cities: Jerash

Jerash is reached by a short drive (29 miles, 47km) north of Amman and is an ancient Graeco-Roman city, once known as Gerasa. It has been dubbed the 'Pompeii of the East', because of its extraordinary state of preservation. Jerash is a vast city,...

Jordan Cities: Kerak

Kerak is a fortress town 75 miles (120km) from Amman, and contains one of the two major Crusader castles in the Kingdom. The castle, built to protect the approach to Jerusalem, stands on a craggy plateau 4,300ft above sea level. It was built in the...

Jordan Cities: Madaba

This small town 19 miles (32km) from Amman is best known for its Byzantine mosaics. These are housed in both private and public buildings, but the most noteworthy is located in the Greek Orthodox church of Saint George. The mosaic is a map of the...

Jordan Tour Guide: Mount Nebo

This is said to be the site from which Moses overlooked the Dead Sea and affords a magnificent view of Palestine. The Franciscan monks bought this site in the 1930s and have excavated the ruins of a sixth century church, which many believe was built...

Jordan Tour Guide: Mukawir

The ruins of the Machaerus fortress is situated on top of a 700-metre high hill 38 miles (61km) from the capital Amman. The fortress belonged to ::I the Great and it is believed that ::I, son of Herod the Great, presented Salome with the head of...

Jordan Cities: Petra

The ancient Nabataean city of Petra (pictured), in the southern part of the Kingdom 160 miles (257km) from Amman, is Jordan's most famous tourist attraction. Known as the "rose red city", it was once a fortress, carved out of craggy rocks in an area...

Jordan Tour Guide: Qal'at al Rabad

Perched on the summit of a mountain 14 miles west of Jerash and 41 miles (66km) from Amman, in the hills of Ajloun, stands this 12th century Arab castle built in defence against the Crusaders. The castle is surrounded by a moat and is in quite a...

Jordan Tour Guide: Qasr Abd

This is one of the Kingdom's finest examples of Hellenistic architecture, situated on a grassy plain just 16 miles (26km) from Amman, near the village of Iraq El Amir. A story (probably apocryphal) is told of a slave who desired the hand of a king'...

Jordan Tour Guide: Shobak

Shobak is situated midway between Kerak and Petra and is 154 miles (248km) from Amman. It contains a large Crusader castle, built around 1115AD, which was repeatedly besieged by Salah al Din and eventually captured in 1189. The castle commands an...

Jordan Tour Guide: Umm el Jimal

This area, 55 miles (86km) from Amman, is known as the 'black oasis', due to the large amount of dark volcanic stone here. The name of the city means in Arabic 'mother of camels' and dates from the Roman-Byzantine period. It was built on an earlier...

Jordan Tour Guide: Wadi Rum

Situated 35 miles (56km) from Amman, this famous wadi has some of the most spectacular desert scenery in the world. T.E. Lawrence and Sherif Hussein took this route in World War I, when fighting against the Ottoman armies, and many scenes from the...

Jordan Tour Guide: Zerka Ma'in

This is a newly-built spa, constructed 25 miles (40km) from Amman on the site of the hot, curative springs that were visited by Herod the Great and subsequent kings of old. The spa offers thermal pools and professionally trained staff.

Kuwait Visas

Nationals of the Gulf Cooperation Council states (GCC -- Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and the Sultanate of Oman) do not need entry visas. All other nationalities require entry visas. Visas can be obtained from Kuwaiti...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Import Restrictions

The following items are not allowed in Kuwait: alcoholic beverages, pork and bacon products, pigskin and, of course, narcotics of any kind. Videos are subject to censorship and some books are blacklisted as politically subversive. Pornography is...

Hotels in Kuwait

Kuwait has many international hotels with excellent amenities. There are also a number of smaller hotels, so there is a complete range of facilities and tariffs to suit all needs. Advance booking and reconfirmation is strongly advised. Hotels are...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Rental Accommodation

Foreign nationals cannot buy real estate in Kuwait. A wide variety of rental accommodation is available, ranging from studio apartments to large villas. There are a number of real estate companies specializing in real estate rentals. Leases for...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Water Quality

Virtually all of Kuwait's water comes from government-constructed seawater desalination plants. The Iraqi occupation did considerable damage to these plants, but most of them are once again fully operational. One of them was the largest in the world...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Communications

Local calls are free and can be made from either shops or local telephone exchanges. Overseas calls can be made from hotels or the telephone exchanges. Postal services are currently being privatized. The Main Post Office is located on Fahd Al-...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Tourist Bus

A sightseeing service runs from Salmiya to the Kuwait Towers. The trip takes about 90 minutes and costs 250 fils.

Kuwait Tour Guide: Activities and Entertainment

There are a number of restaurants and cinemas in Kuwait as well as a wide variety of sporting activities ranging from water sports, bowling and archery to horse racing, cricket and golf. Swimming facilities are available either at the "'Touristic...

Kuwait Tour Guide: Where to Visit

Kuwait National Museum Located on Arabian Gulf Street, the museum is comprised of four buildings and a planetarium. It was looted and burned by the Iraqis during the occupation. The museum includes Al-Sabah Collection of Islamic Art and was...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Visas

All foreigners except nationals of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) must have a valid visa to enter Lebanon. Passports must be valid for at least three months beyond the estimated duration of stay in Lebanon. GCC nationals are issued a three-month...

Customs Regulations of Lebanon

Visitors are allowed 200 cigarettes and one litre of alcohol. The import and export of foreign currency is not restricted. An import license for arms and ammunition is required under all circumstances to be obtained prior to arrival from the...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Travel Documents

Visitors to Lebanon should keep their passports with them at all times. There are military checkpoints all over the country, and even though ID checks are becoming less frequent, being caught without identification papers can cause problems and...

Lebanon Tour Guide: When to Visit

Lebanon is a year-round destination. In terms of weather the best times to visit the country are spring and autumn. The summer coastal climate is hot and humid, but in the mountains it is very pleasant. Winter is mild and rainy in the lowlands and...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Photography

Most international brands of print film are available throughout the country, but slide film is only sold in the larger towns. There are good camera shops with spares and repair facilities. Usually tourists don't encounter problems taking photos,...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Laundry

There are no laundromats in Lebanon, but dry-cleaning facilities are available throughout the country.

Lebanon Tour Guide: Entertainment

Cinemas in the main cities show American and European films with Arabic subtitles. Venues for classical concerts, theatrical productions, and nightclubs can be found in the French daily newspaper L'Orient Le Jour.

Shopping in Lebanon

Beirut is full or shops and markets selling everything from hand woven rugs to electronic equipment, including fashionable clothing. Locally produced handicrafts include pottery, blown glass, embroidered materials, caftans, copper and brass...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Accommodation

Since the war budget accommodation is difficult to find. However, there is a good choice of 5-star hotels and many mid-range hotels are in the process of being rebuilt. All of the country's youth hostels have closed down, but camping facilities are...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Tipping

Tipping is not expected but is usually given for good service. Most restaurants include a service charge but it is customary to leave an extra tip of 5 -- 10%, as wages are much lower now than they were before the war.

Tourist Office in Lebanon

The National Council of Tourism in Lebanon is on Rue Banque du Liban in Beirut. Postal address: P.O. Box 11-5344. Information about vacations in Lebanon can be obtained from Middle Eastern Airline (EM) offices, travel agents, and Lebanese missions...

Lebanon Tour Guide: Organised Tours

A few tour operators have organized tours covering most of Lebanon's places of interest. These are a good option as they are reasonably priced and operate modern air-conditioned coaches. Beirut tour operators Nakhal & Cie Sami El Solh Avenue...

Telecommunications in Lebanon

Lebanon has been actively pursuing a policy of infrastructure reconstruction, especially of its telecommunications systems. The Lebanese PTT has recently: replaced analogue equipment by state of the art digital technology upgraded the national...

Places of Interest in Lebanon: Beirut

Beirut (pictured) is Lebanon's capital and largest city with a population of 1.4 million. Before the war (1975-92), Beirut was known as the Paris of the East, but after 17 years of conflict its motto is now "the city that wouldn't die". Its war...

Geography of Lebanon and Places of Interest Around Beirut

Behind the narrow coastal lowlands are the Lebanon Mountains, which occupy about 33% of the country's surface. Across the mountains is the fertile Bekkaa Valley, beyond which lies the Anti-Lebanon Mountains, bordering Syria. Lebanon’s summers are...

Places of Interest in Lebanon: North of Beirut

Byblos The ancient city of Byblos, 37km from Beirut, gave its name to the Bible and over the centuries has been home to the Phoenicians, Egyptians, Assyrians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Crusaders and Ottomans. Excavations show that Byblos was inhabited...

Places of Interest in Lebanon: south of Beirut

Southern Lebanon is where 4,000 years of colourful history is set among the citrus groves nestled up against the Mediterranean Sea, as well as the scene of heavy shelling during 1979-92 war. Travel is permitted as far as Tyre, 80km south of Beirut...

Libya Tour Guide: Visas

Visitors require a visa, normally valid for 3 months and to be used within 45 days of issue. Visa allocation is carefully controlled, and mostly confined to those actually working in Libya.

Communications in Libya

The Libyan government owns and operates the postal and telecommunications system, with post office box and PTT facilities in all the large towns. The air embargo means that the international mail service is slow, but internal mail is relatively...

Holidays & Festivals in Libya

As a Muslim country, Libya observes all the main Muslim festivals, with some additional national holidays. Friday is the official day of rest. Libyan national holidays are detailed below: March 2nd: Declaration of the People's Authority June...

Tripoli as a Capital of Libya

Tripoli is Libya's largest city and port, and is the country's capital. Meeting-place of the People's Congress and full-time residence of Colonel Qaddafi, it is known in Arabic as Tarabalus Al-Gharb, or Tripoli of the West. Plans are mooted for a...

Tripoli: The Old City of Libya

Tripoli Medina is an ancient walled city, dating from Roman times. Its high walls were originally built on the landward side to repel attacks from the interior, and these survived many invasions throughout the centuries. The city's sea-facing wall...

Libya Tour Guide: Tripoli - The Modern City

During the 18th century, or perhaps a little earlier, the city of Tripoli overspilled its original walls. This outer area was redeveloped in the early 20th century by the Italians, who created a set of administrative buildings, official residences...

Libya Tour Guide: Tripoli's Castle and Museums

The Castle is open daily until 2pm and contains a library and museum. It also commands spectacular views over the old city. Entrance is free. The Castle Museum is situated about 500m away and contains artifacts from Libya's ancient history, with...

Libya Tour Guide: Tripoli's Mosques

Mosque of Ahmad Pasha Karamanli This is probably the most splendid mosque in the entire city. Located a short distance from the castle, at the entrance to the main souq, this mosque was built in 1711 by the founder of the Karamanli dynasty and...

Libya Tour Guide: Benghazi

Libya's second largest city is an important commercial and administrative centre and serves as Eastern Libya's main port. It supports some small industry, mostly food processing and packaging. The modern city has little visual charm, as most of its...

Libya Tour Guide: Leptis Magna

Leptis Magna is a magnificently preserved Roman city, situated to the east of the town of Al-Khums at the mouth of Wadi Lebda. In its earliest days it was probably a port of call on the Phoenician trade routes across the region, and by the 6th...

Libya Tour Guide: Tolmeita (Ptolemais)

The ancient Graeco-Roman port of Ptolemais was named after Ptolemy II Philadelphus, the Egyptian ruler in the 3rd century BC. It was originally the harbour for the inland city of Barce (now known as Al-Marj) and grew in importance during the Roman...

Libya Tour Guide: Cyrene

The modern city is known as Shahat and is situated on the upper slopes of Jabal Al-Akhdar, with impressive views across the plateau towards the sea. Although Shahat itself is visually unremarkable, the nearby ruins of ancient Cyrene, are a vast...

Libya Tour Guide: Susa (Apollonia)

The town of Susa is situated on the coast, about 20km from Shahat. The nearby ruins of Cyrene's harbour, Apollonia, make this an interesting site for the visitor. Founded at the same time as Cyrene, the port was named after the city's chief god,...

Mauritania Tour Guide: Visas

Visas are required by all visitors except the citizens of France and Italy. On arrival, you will be required to fill out a currency and valuables declaration form and you must report to the police at your first large town. Going to Mali, you will...

Mauritania Tour Guide: Embassies

Egypt 32 Rue Oumar Nouakchott Tel: 52192 France Rue Ahmed Oud Mahmed Tel: 251740 Tunisia Tevragh Zeina BP68 Tel: 52817 USA BP 222 Tel. 52660

Mauritania Tour Guide: Camping

You are advised against camping too close to Nouakchott. You can camp on the beach at Tagit Vacances, which is 10km. Along the way there are good fish meals at the small fishing villages.

Mauritania Tour Guide: Tourist offices

For more information on tourism to Mauritania, contact: Maison de l'Afrique, Rue de Viarmes 2 75001 Paris, France Or in Mauritania itself, contact: Tourist Office off Avenue General Nasser Nouakchott Tel: 53337

Mauritania Tour Guide: Nouakchott

On the coast of the Atlantic Ocean and the capital city, Nouakchott provides a good out-of-the-way tourist destination. It is Mauritania's administrative and economic centre and is served by an international airport and a seaport nearby. Its...

Mauritania Tour Guide: Nouadhibou

Formerly known as Port-Étienne, this town in northwestern Mauritania is the administrative centre of the Dakhlet-Nouadhibou Region, on the Atlantic Ocean. Its economy is predominantly based on fishing and fish-processing. The nearby seaport of...

Morocco Tour Guide: Passports and Visas

A full valid passport is required for entry into Morocco. No visa is necessary for nationals of UK, US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and most EC countries. Visitors can stay for three months. Those who wish to extend their stay may apply...

Morocco Tour Guide: Vaccinations

None are required except for those travelling from a country where yellow fever or cholera are prevalent.

Morocco Tour Guide: Tourist Offices

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Tel: 02-651 3181 Paris, France Tel: 42 606350 Sydney, Australia Tel: 612 9224999 Dusseldorf, Germany Tel: 211 370551 Brussels, Belgium Tel: 5122182 Zurich, Switzerland Tel: 252 7752 Madrid, Spain Tel: 5427431 Milan, Italy Tel:...

Morocco Tour Guide: Meknes

Population 750,000 (1990 est.) Called the Moroccan Versailles, this imperial city was built as the Moroccan capital on a fertile plain north of the Middle Atlas, near Fez by Sultan Moulay Ismail, one of the first rulers of the Alawite dynasty that...

Morocco Tour Guide: Rabat and Salé (the imperial cities)

Set more or less in the middle of Morocco's Atlantic coastline on the left bank of the mouth of I River, Rabat is Morocco's political and administrative capital and the official residence of the King. All ministries and embassies are located in...

Morocco Cities: Fez / Fes / Fass

The most ravishing and mystical of Morocco's imperial cities, Fez was founded in 808 AD by the great Moroccan ruler saint Moulay Idris II. When he was about to begin construction he lifted his hands to the heavens and prayed for the city and its...

Morocco Tour Guide: Casablanca / Dar Beida

With an estimated population of 3,210,000, Casablanca is the largest city in Morocco. Sixty per cent of all Moroccan companies and almost every bank has headquarters here, making Casablanca the business capital of Morocco and one of the most...

Morocco Tour Guide: Marrakech / Marrakesh

Population: 1,517,000 (1990 est.) An oasis set upon the fertile Haouz Plain at the foot of the High Atlas Mountains, Marrakech is the fourth of Morocco's Imperial Cities. Founded in 1062 as the capital of the Almoravid dynasty, it continued in the...

Morocco Tour Guide: Kenitra

Population: 905,000 (est.) Kenitra lies on the Sebour River near the Atlantic Ocean on the route between Rabat and Tangier. It was established in 1912 by Marshal Louis Hubert Gonzalve Lyauteyin, Morocco's first French resident general, as a...

Morocco Tour Guide: Asilah

From backwater to cultural centre The town of Asilah is situated on the north western tip of Morocco's Atlantic coast. This picturesque Andalusian town has Phoenician origins, and later became a medieval Portuguese trading post, before its fortunes...

Morocco Tour Guide: Tangier / Tanger / Tanja

Population: 554,000 (est.) Tangier has been called the Gateway to Morocco and has been designated as the country's summer capital by King Hassan II. Overlooking the Straits of Gibraltar with a view of Spain's southern coast, Tangier is set upon a...

Morocco Tour Guide: Tetouan

Population: 200,000 (main city); 856,000 (est. including suburbs) History A lovely white Andalusian city set upon the Mediterranean Sea near Tangier, Tetouan traces its origins back to 3rd century B.C. Then it was a settlement called Tamouda which...

Morocco Tour Guide: Agadir

Population 779,000 (1990) Agadir is Morocco's main western seaport on the Atlantic Ocean. The name is a shortened version of "Agadir n Irir", a Berber word which means "a fortified granary". History Around 1500A.D. the port was occupied by the...

Morocco Tour Guide: Al Aioun / Layounne / Layoun

Population: 93,875 (1982 est.) Layounne is an artificial oasis town built in 1938 by the Spanish government as an administrative centre for the Spanish Sahara. The town remained under Spanish control until Moroccan troops invaded and occupied the...

Morocco Tour Guide: Oujda / Oudjda

Population: 962,000 (est. greater city) Located to the northeast of the country, near Morocco's border with Algeria, Oujda was founded by Berbers of the Zenata tribe in A.D.944. The history and character of the city has been informed by its...

Morocco Tour Guide: Safi

Population: 845,000 (est. greater city) Safi lies on Morocco's central Atlantic coast and has been an important port since Roman times. Then it was known as Asfi, and its people were among the first Moroccans to embrace Islam. The Almohads...

Qatar Tour Guide: Visas

Nationals of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries -- Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and the Sultanate of Oman -- and British passport holders with right of abode in the UK do not need a visa to enter Qatar. If your...

Public Holidays in Qatar

Friday is the weekly holiday with many business working only a half day on Thursday. Embassies and government offices are closed on Thursday. The Muslim holidays of Eid Al-Fitr (at the end of Ramadan), Eid Al-Adha (during the month of the Haj), and...

Qatar Tour Guide: Communications

The mail service into and out of Doha is efficient. The telephone system is also excellent with quick and easy worldwide connections. When calling Qatar from abroad, the country code is 974 -- there are no area or city codes.

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Ghuwair Castle

Built in the early 19th century, the castle is now in ruins. It is rectangular in shape with crenellations and thick walls of stone and mud.

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Jassasiya (Jabal Al-Jassasiya)

Al-Jassasiya is composed of a number of rocky hills overlooking the northeastern coast of the country. Among the hills are numerous stone carvings and engravings, which may date back to pre-historic times. Known for its fine beaches, Al-Jassasiya...

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Khor

About 57km north of Doha on the east coast, Al-Khor is famous for its harbour filled with small craft and fishing boats. It has excellent beaches, an historic tower and interesting mosques. In addition, there is a regional museum housing articles...

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Thughb Fort

Built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, this fort is a simplified example of the military architecture in the Gulf.

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Wajbah Fort

Considered the oldest fort in Qatar, it was the site of battle famous in Qatari history. In 1893AD (1310 A.H.) the people of Qatar under the leadership of Sheikh Qassim bin Mohammed Al-Thani defeated the Ottoman forces.

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Wakrah

Half-way along the east coast between Doha and Umm Said, Al-Wakrah is a commercial and fishing centre. The town has an old port as well as a number of old mosques and traditional houses. The Department of Museums & Antiquities has restored one...

Qatar Tour Guide: Al-Zubarah

Perhaps the most historic town in Qatar, it is about 105km north of Doha. Al-Zubarah is famous for its old fort, which was built by local craftsmen during the time of Sheikh Abdullah bin Qassim Al-Thani (1913-1949). The fort is square in shape with...

Qatar Tour Guide: Ar-Rakiyat Fort

About 110km from Doha, this fort was built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Of rectangular mud and stone construction with three rectangular corner towers and a round one, the fort is an example of the military architectural style in...

Qatar Tour Guide: Burzan Tower

In the Umm Salal Mohammed area, Burzan Tower was built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its watch towers are unique in the Gulf. It is constructed as a rectangle with three levels and an external staircase. Its thick high walls end in...

Qatar Tour Guide: Doha

The capital of the country, Doha is situated half-way down the east coast of the peninsula. It is an important cultural and commercial centre and enjoys excellent communications with the outside world through its modern seaport, airport and...

Qatar Tour Guide: Dukhan

Situated on the west coast of the peninsula, Dukhan is about 84km across the country from Doha. It became important when oil was discovered in the surrounding area. Like Umm Said and Al-Wakrah, the town also has fine beaches.

Qatar Tour Guide: Madinat Al-Shamal

A relatively new town on the northern tip of the peninsula, Madinat Al-Shamal is about 107km north of Doha. It serves as an administrative centre for a number of coastal villages.

Qatar Tour Guide: Murwab Fort

Built during the 9th century AD (3rd century hegira), the fort is some 15km north of Dukhan. It was built during the Abbasid period on the foundations of an older fort around which are five different groups of buildings with a number of houses and...

Qatar Tour Guide: National Museum

Situated on the Corniche in Doha, Qatar's National Museum has received a prize in the Aga Khan Awards scheme. It is housed in the old Emiri Palace complex and has been restored in the traditional style of eastern Arabia. Its arched facades and...

Qatar Tour Guide: Umm Said

Umm Said is the heart of Qatar's industry. Situated 45km south of Doha on the east coast of the peninsula, it has both a commercial port and an oil-exporting port. There are refineries in Umm Said as well as other industrial establishments...

Qatar Tour Guide: Umm Salal Mohammed Fort

A residential fort combining civil and military functions, it has high thick walls with an impressive facade. The fort contains varied examples of architectural and decorative elements.

Sudan Tour Guide: Visas & Permits

Entry visas are required by all nationalities, and are valid for one month. Evidence of a previous visit to Israel or will result in a visa refusal. Permits are required by visitors wishing to travel anywhere outside Khartoum, and can be difficult...

Sudan Tour Guide: Curfew

Until recently, a curfew operated in most large cities and towns from midnight until 4am. However, it is our understanding that the curfew no longer operates and so movement between and within populated areas is much easier.

Sudan Tour Guide: Health and vaccinations

As a result of the war, there is a severe shortage of medicines, trained doctors and hospital equipment in the Sudan. Many serious diseases are common, particularly malaria, meningitis, tuberculosis, hepatitis, measles, dysentery, glaucoma and...

Sudan Tour Guide: Insects and Bugs

Apart from the dangers of malarial mosquitoes, snakes and scorpions can present their own problems! Visitors should keep a watchful eye.

Sudan Tour Guide: Communications

The government is still in charge of running telephone, telegraph and postal services. It was in 1974 that the first earth satellite station was opened in Sudan; the station significantly improved international communications. The government's Sudan...

Public Holidays in Sudan

All regular Islamic holidays and festivals are kept, with the following additions: 1st January: Independence Day, commemorating the birth of the Sudanese Republic in 1956. 30 June: The Inqaz (Salvation) Revolution Day; commemorating National Islamic...

Shopping in Sudan

Weaponry, such as daggers and swords in leather sheaths, can be unearthed in the markets of Sudanese towns. Some local men still wear these as part of everyday attire, but this is becoming an increasingly rare sight. As an exotic souvenir, however,...

Entertainment in Sudan

Cultural events in the Sudan are few and far between. At the end of Ramadan, however, during the Eid Al-Fitr, it is possible to find Sudanese bands performing in the larger towns. As Sudanese music is an interesting blend of Arabian and African,...

Places to Visit in Sudan

Travel in the Sudan poses a number of problems for the visitor, of which all intending to enter the country should be aware. Quite apart from the difficulties involved with transport in a country so recently torn by war, and the internal problems...

Sudan Tour Guide: Khartoum and Omdurman

Khartoum is one of three sister cities, built at the convergence of the Blue and White Niles: Omdurman to the north-west across the White Nile, North Khartoum, and Khartoum itself on the southern bank of the Blue Nile. Khartoum has a relatively...

Sudan Tour Guide: El-Obeid

This is the capital city of the Kordofan region in Western Sudan, and was once the Mahdi's capital and political centre. Situated in the middle of a vast stretch of barren desert, it has a population of 200,000 people and is an important centre for...

Port Sudan

Port Sudan is a harbour city, established by the British in 1905 as a seaport. Once a thriving export centre handling the country's raw commodities such as sesame, cotton and sorghum, it has now fallen into decay as a result of the ongoing war....

Sudan Tour Guide: Kassala

Kassala is situated in Eastern Sudan and has a population of 150,000. The city is built on the Gash River and is the power centre of one of the Sudan's traditional families -- the Khatmiya. On the outskirts of the city and the neighbouring area...

Sudan Tour Guide: Suakin

The island is situated 58km south of Port Sudan and was once a major trading centre, particularly in the 19th century, during the boom years of slavery. As far back as the 10th century BC, Suakin was used by Pharaoh Rameses III as a trading port,...

Sudan Tour Guide: Dongola

Once an important centre of power in ancient Nubia, the remains of the old northern-Sudanese city are being excavated by a Polish-led team -- a project that has been in operation since 1964. The town is now noteworthy for its palm groves and its...

Sudan Tour Guide: Kareema

This northern-Sudanese market-town has a population of about 15,000. The town itself is of little interest, but there are several ancient sites nearby which are worth a visit. Just 2km south of the town is the 100-metre high the Barkal Mountain (...

Sudan Tour Guide: Atbara

Located at the conjunction of the Atbara tributary, flowing down from Ethiopia, and the River Nile, Atbara is on two main railway routes: from Atbara to Port Sudan, and from Khartoum to Wadi Halfa. The city has a population of 75,000 people. In...

Sudan Tour Guide: Jebel Marra Mountains

This western-Sudanese mountain range is dominated by the second-highest mountain in the Sudan, known as Jebel Marra. This is an extinct volcano which rises to a height of 3071 metres. At the base of the mountain range lies the town of Nyala, and...

Sudan Tour Guide: El-Fasher

In the 18th century, El-Fasher was the main centre of the Fur Sultanate. The sultan's palace can still be seen in this western-Sudanese town, and is now a museum. The town was also famous as the starting point of one of the most important camel...

Saudi Arabia Visas

Hajj and Umrah visas A hajj visa is one that is issued to a Muslim wishing to take part in the hajj, which occurs during the first half of the twelfth Islamic month. Hajj visas are issued according to a quota system -- one for every 1000 Muslims in...

Saudi Arabia: Tourist Limitations in The Kingdom

Saudi Arabia is one of the most difficult countries in the world to visit. Unlike other GCC countries, hotels cannot sponsor visitors and for all practical purposes, a tourist visa does not even exist. That said, should you be in the country on...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: Telephones

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has one of the most efficient and reliable telephone services in the world. There is direct dialling to virtually every country in the world. The country code for dialling Saudi Arabia from abroad is 966 followed by the...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The Central Region

The Central Region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia includes the capital, Riyadh, and a number of other important towns, north and west of the capital, such as Buraidah, Unaizah and Ha'il. This is the heartland of the country, and in Arabic is known...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The Eastern Province

Bordering the Arabian Gulf and containing the towns of Dhahran, Al-Khobar, Dammam, Qateef, Hafuf and Jubail, the Eastern Province is where oil was first discovered in Saudi Arabia in the 1930s. Before the discovery of oil, Dammam and Al-Khobar were...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The South-West

The Asir, as the south-western corner of the Kingdom is known, is an area where there are mountains, rainy weather, green landscapes and life without air-conditioning. The mountains of the Asir are part of the same geological fault as the Great...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The Western Region

As far as non-Muslims are concerned, Jeddah is the most important city of Saudi Arabia's western region, known as the Hijaz. Jeddah is by far the most cosmopolitan city in the Kingdom, hardly surprising when you realize it has been the main port...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The Hejaz Railway

The Hejaz Railway was originally built to transport pilgrims from Damascus to Madinah. The idea was first conceived in 1864, during a time of great expansion in railway engineering, but it was not until 40 years later that the initial idea came to...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: Jeddah: Living Amidst The Glitter

If you seek the visually spectacular, Jeddah will never disappoint you. And there is probably nowhere more spectacular than Jeddah's floodlit Corniche in the evening, where over 400 open-air sculptures (pictured) provide a feast for the eye. Their...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: Al Madinah - City of Date Palms

Modern Madinah is eminently accessible, as it is excellently served by wide, well-surfaced highways. It is situated 308 miles/49km from Makkah, 264 miles/425km from Jeddah, 170 miles/275km from Yanbu, and 590 miles/950km from Riyadh, the Kingdom's...

Saudi Arabia Tour Guide: The Red Sea

To anyone standing on its shore and gazing out across its dazzling waters, the Red Sea may seem to be a misnomer. Anything less red cannot be imagined; its blueness is palpable, indisputable and infinite. Yet this is the name which seems to...

The Barre Regime of Somalia

The British and Italian regions became independent on July the 1st 1960 and were merged as the Republic of Somalia. A parliamentary system was adopted in the new republic until October 21st 1969, when a group of military officers led by General Siad...

Somalia Tour Guide

A number of hotels were built when a new deep-water port was opened in the capital Mogadishu with the help of the World Bank. However, tourism to Somalia is not encouraged. There are many historical cities, and in the south of Somalia the flora and...

Syria Tour Guide: Visa

All foreign visitors require a visa. Tourist visas are valid for 15 days and must be used within one month of the date of issue.

Syria Tour Guide: Damascus

Said to be the world's oldest inhabited city, Damascus today (pictured) is a thriving modern capital. Three thousand years ago it was the capital of the Aramean Kingdom and was later conquered by Alexander the Great, when it became an important...

Syria Tour Guide: Latakia

Syria's main port is on the north coast, on the shores of the Mediterranean. Known to the ancient world as Laodicea, it has grown from a small fishing village to today's thriving port. Its surrounding beaches and large, out-of-town hotels are much...

Syria Tour Guide: Tartus

The second most important Syrian seaport on the Mediterranean (90 kms to the south of Latakia). It was called Antaradus by the Phoenicians and Tartusa by the Byzantines. Tortusa was to become of the main supply ports for the Crusaders and a military...

Syria Tour Guide: Aleppo

Said to have been built over 5,000 years ago, Aleppo is Syria's second largest city and is a thriving industrial and commercial centre. It has been a major trading centre since Roman times and has been much visited by the merchants of Europe. This...

Syria Tour Guide: Crac des Chevaliers

Also known as the Qala'at al-Hosn or "Castle of the Knights", this amazingly well-preserved fortress is situated on an important defensive site, a gap in the mountain range between the city of Homs and the sea. It was built in the 12th century from...

Syria Tour Guide: Bosra

Situated about 40km east of Der'a, Bosra is famous for its impressive and beautiful Roman theatre. It is an unusual structure in that it has a fortress built around it, probably constructed during the Umayyad and Abbasid periods. It is this fortress...

Syria Tour Guide: Hama

Hama is a river town, built on the banks of the Orontes. The town is famous for the 17 huge wooden water wheels, known as norias, which once scooped water from the river and deposited it into the aqueducts, which then supplied homes, public...

Syria Tour Guide: Palmyra

Palmyra is 150 miles (243km) northeast of Damascus, and is Syria's most famous tourist attraction. Situated at an oasis in the desert, this ruined city is at a considerable distance from any other water source, as it is 150km from the Orontes River...

UAE Tour Guide: Communications

The postal system in the UAE is very modern and the post offices are among the most efficient in the Gulf. Between the UAE and Europe or the USA, mail takes about ten days. To Australia, mail takes about eight to ten days. There is an excellent...

UAE Tour Guide: The Dubai Museum

Al-Fahidi Fort, built in 1800, is home to the Dubai Museum, and is thought to be Dubai's oldest building. In the past the fort was used to defend the town from warlike neighbouring tribes. It has also served, at various times throughout history as...

Traditional Music in The United Arab Emirates

The music precedes the players, as the throb of drumbeats beckons through the twilight. A steadily increasing stream of people, attracted by the sound and the beat, move towards the gaily coloured lights, which mark the site of the celebration. The...

Visas of UAE

Citizens of GCC countries (Gulf Cooperation Council: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and the Sultanate of Oman) and British nationals with the right of abode in the UK do not need visas to enter the UAE. GCC nationals can stay more or less as...

Yemen Tour Guide: Visas

Visas can be obtained either in advance at Yemen diplomatic missions or on arrival in the country. Visitors could obtain a single entry tourist/visitor visa for up to two months validity from the date of issuing, or a single entry business and...

Yemen Public Holidays

Friday is the official day of rest, when offices are closed. On weekdays, banks and government offices open from 8 or 9am until 12 noon or 1pm and close in the afternoon. Shops and restaurants open in the mornings and again in the evenings. Islamic...

Yemen Tour Guide: Shopping

Nowhere in the Yemen can be described as a shoppers' paradise although, for those looking for unusual souvenir gifts, local craft goods are sometimes available. Yemeni silverware can be found in Sana'a and Ta'izz -- some genuinely old, some...

Yemen Tour Guide: Aden

Aden is a natural port, built on an old volcanic site and first used by the ancient Kingdom of Awsan between the 5th and 7th centuries B.C. The port's convenient position on the most important sea route between India and Europe, attracted the...

Yemen Tour Guide: Sana'a

The city's history Sana'a is one of Arabia's oldest living cities, supposedly founded by Shem, one of the three sons of Noah. In the second century it was the main highland garrison town of the Sabean Kingdom, whose capital, Mareb, was situated...

Yemen Tour Guide: Barakesh - a Minean Caravan City

Barakesh is the most impressive of all Yemen's ancient sites. Its fortified city wall is 14 metres high and is constructed from a beautiful calcite stone, mined from neighbouring Djebel Yam and carefully carved into blocks. Some of these massive...

Yemen Tour Guide: Wadi Dhahr

A fertile wadi, about 15km north of Sana'a, with small villages and clay-walled orchards, which grows grapes, apricots, peaches, pomegranates and nuts. It is also renowned for a beautiful five-storey rock palace, Dar al-Hajar, which belonged to the...

Yemen Tour Guide: Amran

An ancient city dating back to Sabean times. The city walls are medieval.

Yemen Tour Guide: Kohlan

A typical mountain village. Mountain paths leading down to the village make an interesting walk.

Yemen Tour Guide: Mareb

The capital of the Sabean Kingdom from the fifth century BC and one of Yemen's most impressive archaeological sites. There are two dams worth visiting visit: the ancient one, dating from about 10 BC; the modern one built in 1986. An area about 2km...

Yemen Tour Guide: Manakha

An important Turkish stronghold in days gone by.

Yemen Tour Guide: Alhajarah

A typical fortified mountain village, which provides some perfect examples of dry-stone building.

Yemen Tour Guide: Hoteib

An important and picturesque village, nestling in the mountains; goal of the Ismaeli pilgrims. Terraces on the mountainside grow qat and coffee.

Yemen Tour Guide: Thula

A village of pre-Islamic origin, situated along the ancient spice route, about 9km north of Shibam. There are many remarkable examples of stone architecture, including tower houses, well-preserved aqueducts and splendidly carved water cisterns near...

Yemen Tour Guide: Shibam

Lying at the foot of the mountain below the stronghold of Kawkaban, Shibam was once the capital of a small, independent highland state. Ancient inscriptions can be found on the stones of the city gate and in other old buildings of the town. In the...

Yemen Tour Guide: Kawkaban

An important stronghold during the Turkish occupation of lower regions of the Yemen, Kawkaban served to protect the town of Shibam below. It is built at the summit of a 350-metre cliff and the town's inhabitants were often evacuated there during...

Yemen Tour Guide: Hababa

Situated on the plain between Shibam and Thula, this old town, with its ancient Himyaritic inscriptions, is worth visiting.

Yemen Tour Guide: Tawila

A typical mountain village on the way to the coast -- a once famous centre during Turkish rule.

Yemen Tour Guide: Al-Hudayah

Yemen's main port is the largest city of the Tihamah region. It is a comparatively young city, but its oldest part can be found near the old market area, in the Turkish quarters. Many examples of old-style housing can be seen here, including a...

Yemen Tour Guide: Ta'izz

A town situated in the northern foothills of Jebel Saber (Mount Sabir). The former palace of Imam Ahmed is now a museum. The museum is located at the end of 26th September Street and its opening hours are from 8am till 12 noon. The city walls and...

Yemen Tour Guide: Ibb

Situated in one of the Yemen's most lush valleys. Visit the old city, which contains some interesting old stone tower houses.

Yemen Tour Guide: Saada

This is the northernmost provincial capital of Yemen, an ancient city built of clay bricks and mud. These buildings are a perfect example of zabur architecture, dating from pre-Islamic days. The Great Mosque was built in the 12th century. The town'...

Yemen Tour Guide: Djiblah

Situated 8km south of Ibb, on a hill of basalt between two connecting valleys, this is another former capital of the Yemen from the Middle Ages. It was once the chosen capital of Queen Arwa bint Ahmad (1067 AD to 1138 AD), who ruled for almost 70...

Yemen Tour Guide: Dhamar

Of pre-Islamic origin. The mosque is worth visiting.

Yemen Tour Guide: Zabid

A small coastal village said to have been the birthplace of algebra in the Middle Ages, when it contained no less than 230 colleges. It was founded in 820 AD by Muhammad ibn Abdullah ibn Ziyah, father of the Ziyadid dynasty. He also founded an...

Yemen Tour Guide: Ma'in

Once known as Qarnaw, when it was the capital of the Minean Kingdom. There are two well-preserved temples here.

Yemen Tour Guide: Al-Mukalla

This is a seaport and fishing centre in the southern part of the Hadhramawt province, and was founded in 1035A.D. as a fishing village. The beautiful white buildings in the old town are of interest to visitors and there are several impressive...

Yemen Tour Guide: Wadi Hadhramawt

This is the largest wadi in the Arabian peninsula. Situated about 160km from the coast, it follows an east-west route for about 160km through the desert. The wadi bottom drops to a depth of about 300 metres. The region is very fertile and the local...